Tag: Dennis Warren (page 1 of 4)

07/20/17 “Engaging the Five Aggregates – Part 2” with Dennis Warren

The Arising Of Wisdom Through Engaging “The Five Aggregates” – Part 2

Wisdom (Insight), from a Buddhist perspective, arises from “hearing” (listening to the Dharma), study and reflection capped by non-conceptual direct experience. This formula involves intentionally focusing the mind and attention on a number of different experiences, supported by the underlying psychology outlined by the historical Buddha.
This is the second in a series of interlocking talks about the arising of Wisdom (Insight). The first talk focused on the dilemma of suffering thru clinging (becoming attached) to, then identifying with five separate, but tightly related features of human experience – form, feeling, perception, volitional or mental formations (deeply embedded habits of mind) and consciousness. It’s helpful to review the first talk in this series.

For those who are using the book In The Buddha’s Words – An Anthology of Discourses from the Pali Cannon, edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi as a reference, you can read the following: VII. The Path To Liberation – Introduction, pages 301-309, and the sutta at pages 335 to 337. In the alternative, follow these links to see Samyutta Nikaya 22, The Connected Discourses on the Aggregates, 56 (on https://suttacentral.net/):

If you would like to download this talk, please right click and select “save as” here.

06/29/2017 “Engaging the Five Aggregates” with Dennis Warren

THE ARISING OF WISDOM THROUGH ENGAGING “THE FIVE AGGREGATES”

Wisdom (Insight), from a Buddhist perspective, arises from “hearing” (listening to the Dharma), study and reflection capped by non-conceptual direct experience. This formula involves intentionally focusing the mind and attention on a number of different experiences, supported by the underlying psychology outlined by the historical Buddha.

This will be the first in a series of interlocking talks about the arising of Wisdom (Insight). The first talk will focus on the dilemma of suffering thru clinging (becoming attached) to, then identifying with five separate, but tightly related features of human experience – form, feeling, perception, volitional or mental formations (deeply embedded habits of mind) and consciousness.

The notion of “The Five Aggregates” is a fundamental aspect of Buddhist practice which can easily seem like theory or philosophy – but it is anything but conceptual thinking. During this evening, we’ll explore how this aspect of practice can become a real and tangible gateway into understanding attachment, identification and suffering.

For those who are using the book In The Buddha’s Words – An Anthology of Discourses from the Pali Cannon, edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi as a reference, please read the following: VII. The Path To Liberation – Introduction, pages 301-309, and the sutta at pages 335 to 337.

In the alternative, follow these links to see Samyutta Nikaya 22, The Connected Discourses on the Aggregates, 56 (on https://suttacentral.net/):

If you would like to download this talk, please right click and select “save as” here.

To listen to Part 2 of this talk series, click here.

06/01/2017 “Exploring Attachment and Its’ Consequences – Part 2” with Dennis Warren

Exploring Attachment and Its’ Consequences – Part II

This evening with be the second in an exploration of the Buddhist element of Attachment and its consequences. In particular, we will look at the nature of “positive” attachment which is an important part of practice development; and how positive attachment, which begins as a healthy aspiration, can become problematic and counter-productive. It would be helpful if you could revisit the first evening’s on-line audio exploration on this topic (click here) presented April 27.

If you would like to download this talk, please right click and select “save as” here.

05/20/2017 “Attention & Mindful – An Exploration” Retreat with Dennis Warren

Day-long Retreat on the theme: Attention & Mindful – An Exploration

Mindfulness is sometimes described as non-judgmental “bare” attention. As helpful as this general description may be, it tends to cloud the fact that there is a significant difference between attention and mindfulness. They play separate and distinct roles in practice. And, most importantly, it gives no hint of the reality that attention and mindfulness are both purposeful in Buddhist practice. In a period of time when both of these terms are been uncoupled from their historical Buddhist meanings, what do they mean for each of us as 21st century, urban practitioners?

This will be a day of practice, reflection, experimentation and investigation:

  • What is the functional difference between attention and mindfulness?
  • What are we supposed to be paying attention to and being mindful of?
  • What does it mean that attention and mindfulness are purposeful in Buddhist practice?

What is the relationship between the answers to these questions and the underlying psychology of the historical Buddha?

If you would like to download this talk, please right click and select “save as” here.

If you would like to download this talk, please right click and select “save as” here.

04/27/2017 “Exploring Attachment and Its Consequences” with Dennis Warren

Exploring Attachment and Its Consequences

All of us have some understanding of the Buddhist element of Attachment. This evening with SIM Founding Teacher Dennis Warren will involve a practical and in-depth exploration of Attachment; its role in Buddhist psychology; its place in the Buddhist description of causation; the phenomenon of “positive” attachment; and Attachment’s consequences, both intentional and unanticipated.

Talk handout: Foundational Qualities of Mind (PDF)

If you would like to download this talk, please right click and select “save as” here.

To listen to Part 2 of the series, click here.

 

04/06/2017 “Forgetting and Remembering” with Dennis Warren

Forgetting and Remembering

The original definition of Mindfulness contains the element of “remembering.” What does this mean? And why is it important? What are we “forgetting?” What are we trying to “remember?” Does it mean remembering to engage in “moment-to-moment non-judgmental awareness”? As difficult as it is to maintain such a state of mind, is that it? Is that all? Or is there more? Or is there much more?
Understanding these questions, and their answers, in the context of the historical Buddha’s teachings, is important to practicing well and developing a progressively maturing practice. Reflect on these questions and come prepared with your questions to supplement the talk and discussion.

To view the handout for this talk, click here.

If you would like to download this talk, please right click and select “save as” here .

03/09/2017 “Revisiting the Meaning, Benefits & Risks of Suffering” with Dennis Warren

Revisiting the Meaning, Benefits & Risks of Suffering

We talk so much about “suffering” in Buddhist practice, we sometimes lost touch with the original meaning of suffering found in the historical Buddha’s teaching. Instead, we turn we slide into a western psychological meaning. And we also lose touch with the tangible benefits and the clear risks or dangers of suffering.
This evening with SIM Founding Teacher, Dennis Warren, will explore the meaning, benefits and risks of suffering from a Buddhist perspective. It will extend a number of the principles outlined in Dennis’s talk on February 16th. You may want to review that talk as a way of preparing for this topic.

If you would like to download this talk, please right click and select “save as” here.

02/16/2017 “Transforming Ourselves, Transforming Our Country” with Dennis Warren

Transforming Ourselves, Transforming Our Country

The aim of the historical Buddha’s teachings is nothing less than a transformation of how we understand ourselves and our experience; how we relate to each other; and how we engage the world around us. He provided us with a substantial system of practices supported by a dynamic psychology to move toward these goals. These practices and psychology are equally applicable to transformation in the inner sense, as well as the outer sense. What we do and say in the world is a reflection of our inner landscape.

This evening will explore the intersection between inner and outer transformation, and how the practices and psychology handed down to us by the Historical Buddha are essential in dealing with the turbulence, chaos and change taking place in our country. That change is broad and deep – socially, culturally, racially and politically. In this context, we’ll look at the role and obligations of those in spiritual communities, both individually and collectively, in making decisions about government initiated or sanctioned harming and violence.

There are two handouts referenced in this talk:

If you would like to download this talk, please right click and select “save as” here

Meditative Poetry: FLOYD SKLOOT – In Morning Light

01/12/2017 “Recommendations for Practice in 2017 – part 2” Dennis Warren

Recommendations for Practice in 2017 (Part 2)

The teachings of the historical Buddha are vast in number and seemingly complex in nature. But he also urged us not to rely on initial surface impressions; instead, to look underneath and behind our impressions to what is really present. When we apply these principles to the Buddha’s teachings, we discover an integrated system of methods and psychology that flow from a number of foundational elements.
This evening with SIM’s Founding Teacher Dennis Warren will build upon and expand the discussion we began on Thursday, January 5. That evening looked at a number of elements of practice to focus on in beginning 2017. It may be helpful to review Dennis’ (Part 1) talk on that evening.
The evening will include a number of special practice recommendations; examine why the inter-related nature of the Buddha’s teachings is so helpful in examining our own individual practices; and explore a number of potential risks or hazards on the path of practice.
To view the handout for this talk, click here.

If you would like to download this talk, please right click and select “save as” here.

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